Sr. Sally Professes Vows

Alive in Oneness with Christ and all creation, the theme for Sister Sally Koch’s first vows was “We are Parts of the Whole” and indeed the community that gathered virtually and physically for Sally’s vows represented parts of the whole. She was surrounded by her Porter Ranch, California community and congregational delegate Sr. Kathy Stein. Family members and friends from the many organizations she has been a part of throughout her life and sisters who have been a part of her formation all gathered mostly virtually for a ceremony that called us to Love greater and wider in our world that is hurting.

Her ceremony on July 18 included readings from Colossians, Sue Monk Kidd, Joyce Rupp, and Nan C. Merrill. Kathleen Patrice “KP” Sullivan, CSJ gave the reflection followed by a bread breaking liturgical prayer.
read Sister KP’s reflection

Sally made the religious vows of chastity, the vow that calls us to honest self-expression and inclusive right relationships; poverty, the vow to hold all things lightly; and obedience, the vow of listening deeply according to the Constitution of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet.

Sally has been deeply touched and grateful to everyone who has sent their love, affirmations, and support through all of the cards, greetings, and emails.

#YouAreMySister

Catholic Sisters in communities around the world are reporting growing evidence of a rise in hunger and vulnerability to human trafficking – and they want to be part of an effective, coordinated response.

Sisters are uniquely placed to address the most pressing issues affecting people in poor communities due to the pandemic because they are already at the center of healthcare, education, and community development efforts worldwide.

Sr. Rosemary Flanigan Reflects

I would like to share an article about one of my ‘firecracker’ sisters. Just one of the amazing women I’m honored and privileged to call ‘my sister’ in our community.

SSt. Joseph Sr. Rosemary Flanigan speaks at the Center for Practical Bioethics' annual dinner in 2018. (Courtesy of the Center for Practical Bioethics)r. Rosemary Flanigan has been called “ethics in action” and a “force of nature.” Both monikers have been appropriate for more than 50 years.

As a young nun in the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet, she flew with five other sisters from St. Louis, Missouri, to Selma, Alabama, in March 1965 to participate in a voting rights march. Read more….

Masking for the Dear Neighbor

We are living through extraordinary times. I am reminded of the beginning of Dickens’s book: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. We are facing a pandemic, an economic meltdown, social unrest, violence, and injustice against people of color and against immigrants. As people of faith, we are called to live with an extraordinary commitment to the gospel.

As Sisters of St. Joseph, we are called to reach out to others, whom we call our ‘dear neighbor’. There is no stranger for a Sister of St. Joseph. There are only dear neighbors to whom we reach out in prayer, kindness, and service. We have been asked to wear face coverings. In some regions and organizations, we are mandated to wear masks. We have learned that our masks provide limited protection to the wearer and substantial protection to the dear neighbor whom they encounter. Public health professionals tell us that we are all interconnected. The health of all is interconnected. Public health official echo the charism of the Sisters of St. Joseph: we are all Dear Neighbors. So I am wearing a mask for the dear neighbor.

Stay safe and healthy!

Peace,

Amy

Something New

I am about to do something new. See, I have already begun! Do you not see it? I will make a pathway through the wilderness. I will create rivers in the dry wasteland. (Is 43:19)

Really new things are both completely obvious and completely unimaginable. So when making something new, God finds it necessary to point it out – really, there’s something new here. See the pathway through the wilderness? See the rivers running in the wasteland? The destruction you feared is not the end of the story. It is merely a transition, a new chapter.

I can hear those trite infomercials that try to sell you something crazy…. but wait, there’s more!! So God says, as we lament what is passing away: but wait, there’s more. As we stand by the tomb on Holy Saturday: but wait, there’s more. And in religious life, as we lament the passing of the greatest generation of religious that we have ever known in the US, God says: I am about to do something new. See I have already begun. “But wait, there’s more…”
We are building relationships that will sustain us deep into the 21st century. With a firm grip on hope, we celebrate what has been, and we grieve its passing. With deepening confidence, we let our sisters go, one by one, into the great promise of death and resurrection. And we commit ourselves to this new thing that God is doing among us. … but wait, there’s more!
–Amy